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The Best Way To Pair Wine With A Charcuterie Board 

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There’s a reason wine and charcuterie boards are so popular, they are the ultimate balance of flavors and textures.


 So whether it’s a standard wine-and-cheese happy hour or a special occasion, creating an amazing charcuterie board paired with the perfect wine, will take your gathering to a new level of happy!

Charcuterie Boards are one of the easiest appetizers to make and everyone loves them!

Dating back to the 15th century in France, Charcuterie (pronounced: shahr-koo-tr-ee) is a “French term for a branch of cooking devoted to preserve meat products such as bacon, ham, sausage, terrines, galantines, pâté, and confit, primarily from pork.”

Let’s Talk About The Basics Of Wines

There are two bottles of white wine laying down. There is a wine bottle with pink wine in it standing upright in between them. There are three stemmed wine glasses. The glasses are standing next to the wine bottles. Items are on a light gray surface with a white tile back wall.

White Wines

  • Light-bodied white wines are low alcohol wines which means they usually have around 12.5% or less alcohol and have high acidity.

Fun Fact – Light-bodied white wines are the top selling wines in the world. Their popularity is due to how easily they pair with most foods.

  • Medium white wines have an alcohol content between 12.5% and 13.5%. 
  • Full-bodied white wines have the most alcohol content, 13.5% or higher.
There are three bottles of red wine. Two of the wine bottles are laying down. The third wine bottle is standing upright in between them. There are two stemmed wine glasses and one without a stem. The glasses are standing next to the wine bottles. Items are on a light gray surface with a white tile back wall.

Red Wines

  • Light-bodied red wines usually have an alcohol content less than 12.5%. They are also lower in tannins and have a moderate high acidity. 
  • Medium-bodied red wines tend to have an alcohol content of between 12.5% and 13.5%. They have more tannins than a light-bodied red wines but less than  full-bodied red wines.
  • Full-bodied red wines are any reds with more than 13.5%alcohol. Full-bodied wines have more complex flavors and feel richer when drinking.

All These Delicious Wines Selected For This Charcuterie Board Are Under $20.00 A Bottle!

  • Pinot Grigio – light bodied white 
  • Sauvignon Blanc – crisp white 
  • Rose Cotes De Provence – moderate acidity 
  • Pinot Noir – light bodied red 
  • Cabernet Sauvignon – medium bodied red 
  • Toscano Super Tuscan – full bodied red

That’s So Cheesy!

 Different types of cheeses complement different wines. 

Choose a few cheeses from a variety of families to match the wine you want to serve.

There is a black cutting board with six wedges of cheese. Two of the wedges are light yellow, one wedge is yellow with blue berries in it, one wedge is light yellow with blue veins running through it. There is a wedge with a white rind and one with a brown rind. The board is on a light grey surface.

Fresh Cheeses

Fresh cheeses offer a range of textures and flavors. They can have spent very little time aging. They can be creamy, salty, and tangy.

Types of Fresh Cheese: French Chèvre, ricotta, mozzarella, feta, cream cheese, domestic soft goat cheese, and Boursin.

Styles of Wine – Bubbly, light-bodied white wine, aromatic white wines, and fruit forward light-bodied reds.

Wine Pairing Ideas –  Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Blanc, Rosé wine, Chenin Blanc, and Pinot Noir.

Semi-Soft Cheeses

Semi-soft cheeses are mild in flavor and  typically have a creamy texture which becomes harder as it ages.

Types of Semi-Soft Cheese – Havarti, Monterey Jack, and Asiago.

Styles of Wine – Dry light-bodied white wine, full-bodied oaked white wine, and medium-bodied red wine.

Wine Pairing Ideas – Pinot Grigio, Pinot Blanc, Oaked Chardonnay, Syrah, and some Cabernet Sauvignons.

Soft Ripened Cheeses (bloomy rind cheese)

This style of cheese is usually the favorite on a charcuterie platter!

Types of Soft-Ripened Cheese: Brie, Camembert, Fromager d’Affinois, and Humboldt Fog.

Styles of Wine: Light and dry whites like sparkling wine and Rosé. Full-bodied and fruity whites. Fruit forward light-bodied reds.

Wine Pairing Ideas: Chenin Blanc, Riesling, Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Cabernet Sauvignon.

Semi-Hard Cheeses

The semi-hard cheese category includes a broad range of firm cheeses with high moisture content. Aged for less than half a year, semi-hard cheeses are known for their delicate flavors and aroma.

Types of Semi-Hard Cheese: Cheddar, Gouda, Havarti, Gruyere, Provolone, Ossau Iraty, and Manchego.

Styles of Wine: Sparkling wine, sweet white wines, white wine (light-bodied and full-bodied), and light- to medium-bodied red wines.

Wine Pairing Ideas: Cava, Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, and Beaujolais.

Aged Hard Cheeses

Hard cheeses are typically salty and sharp with nutty flavors. Most of the moisture is removed from the curd during the cheesemaking process. They tend to be crumbly and harder to cut.

Types of Hard Cheese: Aged Cheddar, aged Manchego, Parmigiano Reggiano, and Pecorino Romano

Styles of Wine: Sparkling wine, light-bodied white wine, medium-bodied red wines, and full-bodied red wines.

Wine Pairing Ideas:  Pinot Grigio, Rose’, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, or a Super Tuscan. 

Blue Cheese

Blue cheese  is salty and pungent but some can be sweeter. It can be soft, firm, creamy, or crumbly. But all blue cheeses feature blue veins of mold throughout that bring sharp and tangy flavors.

Types of Blue Cheese – Gorgonzola, Roquefort, and Stilton. 

Wine Pairing Styles – Aromatic white wines, bolder red wines, and dessert wines.

Wine Pairing Ideas – Riesling, Chardonnay, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Super Tuscan, and Zinfandel. 

There is a large wooden board with a variety of food items: Meats, cheeses, strawberries, blackberries, nuts, olives, crackers, chocolate truffles, and fresh green herbs. There are three bottles of wine and three clear wine glasses. Items are on a light grey surface with a white time black wall.

All the cheeses for this particular charcuterie board I bought at Whole Foods, their variety of cheeses is amazing!

Semi-Hard

  • Ossau Iraty (Agour)- Sheep milk from France
  • Saint Gil D Albio (Garrotxa) – Goat milk from Spain
  • Blueberry Wensleydale (Somerdale) – Cow milk with blueberries from England

Hard

  • Barley Buzzed Cheddar (Beehive Cheese Company) – Cow milk from the United States

Blue Cheeses

  • Bayley Hazen Blue (Jasper Hill Farm) – Cow milk from the United States

Soft-ripened

  • Fromage d’Affinois (Brie) – Cow milk from France

Some Full Proof Tips When Pairing Wine with Cheese

  • Match flavors – Light cheeses with light wines. Bolder cheeses with fuller bodied wines.
  • Contrast Flavors – Salty and savory cheeses with sweeter wines.
  • Pair From The Same Region – This works so well! If you love a wine from certain location, pair it with a cheese from the same area.

 How To Arrange A Charcuterie Board 

There is a large wooden board with a variety of food items: Meats, cheeses, strawberries, blackberries, nuts, olives, crackers, chocolate truffles, and fresh green herbs. There are three bottles of wine and three clear wine glasses. Items are on a light grey surface with a white time black wall.

Be Creative And Have Fun When Build A Charcuterie Board!

Choose Your Board –

  • Boards can be different sizes and different shapes.
  • The size of your wooden board depends on the number of people you are serving. You can also use multiple boards, dishes, or platters.
  • Any flat surface will work.
  • Throw down some butcher paper on a kitchen island or counter top and create a board!

Start with the cheeses –

  • Place the cheeses around the board in different locations (corners and center).

 Next is the meats –

  • Offer a variety of meats as well. Spicy and mild.
  • Examples: Hard salami, prosciutto, pepperoni, dried beef, and sliced turkey (for guests that don’t eat red meat).  You can also include pates and jerky.
  • Fan out, roll, or fold the meats and place them on the board close to the cheeses.

Add the sweet and savory spreads and accompaniments –

  • Mustards, jams, and briny items (olives and pickles). Try these savory Bacon Wrapped Dates, super delicious!

Add your crackers and bread –

  • Don’t forget the vessels to carry the meats and cheeses.

Add sweet and savory nibbles –

  • Fill in the nooks and crannies with fresh fruits, dried fruit, and nuts.

Toss some sprigs of fresh herbs around the board for color and fragrance!

Some Tips When Pairing Wine with Cheese

Match flavors –

  • Light cheeses with light wines.
  • Bolder cheeses with fuller bodied wines.

Contrast Flavors –

  • Salty and savory cheeses with sweeter wines.

Pair From The Same Region –

  • This works so well!
  • If you love a wine from certain location, pair it with a cheese from the same area.
There is a large wooden board with a variety of food items: Meats, cheeses, strawberries, blackberries, nuts, olives, crackers, chocolate truffles, and fresh green herbs. There are four bottles of wine and three clear wine glasses. Items are on a light grey surface with a white time black wall.

Frequently Asked Questions

How Much Do I Serve Per Person On A Charcuterie Board?

Think about your group and customize the board based on how many people you will be serving. If it is the main meal, double the portions per person.

Cheeses: 2 to 3 ounces per person.

Meats: 2 to 3 ounces per person.

Bread: 2 slices per person.

Fruit and vegetables: 4 to 8 ounces per person.

Crackers: 3 to 4 per person per item.

Do You Need To Spend A Lot Of Money For Good Wine?

Believe it or not, spending a lot of money on wine doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a good wine.

It’s the flavor profile that you want to look at.

There are plenty of incredible wines both red and white, for under $20.00 a bottle. Find out how much people usually spend on a bottle from Bright Cellars, it might surprise you!

How long can a charcuterie board sit out before serving?

Charcuterie meats and cheeses have the most flavor when served at room temperature.

Remember it isn’t safe for meats and cheeses should not be left out at room temperature for more than two hours total.

Check out other recipes from Join Me In The Kitchen that will tantalize your taste buds:

How To Create A Lox Charcuterie Board

Ideas On How To Make The Best Beef Charcuterie Board

How To Make Torchy’s Tacos Damn Good Queso Dip (Copycat) – Super easy!

Pigs In A Blanket With Mustard Whiskey Sauce – A crowd favorite!

Rubio’s Grilled Gourmet Shrimp Tacos Recipe – So delicious!

The Best Way To Pair Wine With A Charcuterie Board

There is a large wooden board with a variety of food items: Meats, cheeses, strawberries, blackberries, nuts, olives, crackers, chocolate truffles, and fresh green herbs. There are four bottles of wine and three clear wine glasses. Items are on a light grey surface with a white time black wall.

 Creating an amazing charcuterie board paired with the perfect wine, will take your gathering to a new level of happy! And it's so easy!

Prep Time 45 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • Wine- Have a variety
  • Cheeses
  • Meats
  • Jams
  • Spreads (tapenades, pates, honey)
  • Brine / pickled condiments
  • Crusty bread / crackers
  • Fresh fruits
  • Nuts
  • Dried fruits
  • Sprigs of fresh herbs.

Instructions

  1. Select the cheeses
  2. Select the meats
  3. Pair the wines with the cheeses and meats (see notes)
  4. Choose your board - depending on the number of guests
  5. Let the cheeses and meats come to room temperature
  6. Arrange your board starting with the cheeses and meats, spreads, brine items, fresh fruit, crackers, bread, nuts, and dried fruit.

Notes

Wine And Charcuterie Boards Bring Out The Best In Each Other - Be Creative and have fun!

Some Tips When Pairing Wine with Cheese

  • Match flavors - Light cheeses with light wines. Bolder cheeses with fuller bodied wines.
  • Contrast Flavors - Salty and savory cheeses with sweeter wines.
  • Pair From The Same Region - This works so well! If you love a wine from certain location, pair it with a cheese from the same area.

Pro Tips:

  • Keep it colorful. We eat with our eyes first.
  • Meats and Cheeses are always served best when served at room temperature. I recommend assembling your board 45 minutes to an hour before serving.
  • Use small bowls to serve any condiments or pickled food along with toothpicks, small spoons or forks.
  • Have variety. Cater to different palates with a selection of sweet and savory options.
  • Keep it interesting with creamy, crunchy, gooey, and crumbly textures.

Think about your group and customize the board based on how many people you will be serving. If it is the main meal, double the portions per person.

Wine: 1 bottle per person

Meats: 2 to 3 ounces per person

Cheeses: 2 to 3 ounces per person

Bread: 2 slices per person

Fruit and vegetables: 4 to 8 ounces per person

Crackers: 3 to 4 per person per item

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